Trees of the South Arboretum

Tree 1: Franksred Acer Rubrum Red Sunset

Sunset has vibrant leaf and broadly oval uniform habit making it a most attractive form of Red Maple. Its real show happens in the autumn when its green leaves turn a dramatic red.

Sponsor: Geoffrey Peters

In loving memory of my mum Pamela Peters who loved playing golf with my dad and her many friends at the Club from 1999 to 2014.

Tree 2: Deodar Cedar

This Cedar was introduced from the Himalayas back in 1831. Due to its extensive ultimate size, it was favoured for planting in the grounds of many stately homes, large country houses and Georgian rectories.

Sponsor: Julian Nicholls

In loving memory of Kareen Nicholls who so enjoyed the Club and particularly Woodcote Park.

Tree 3: Pride of India

Introduced from China in the 1760s, its profuse small yellow flowers develop in late spring. These form lantern shaped fruits that turn red in the autumn.

Sponsor: Geoffrey Peters

In loving memory of my father Dennis Peters who was born in India, loved India, fought in WW2 in the Indian Army, never surrendered and escaped capture from the Japanese and loved playing golf with my mum at the Club from 1990 to 1997.

Tree 4: Purple Beech

This pretty, deep foliaged, tree has dark purple red foliage which appears in the spring time. Like many other purple leaved specimens, it gradually turns to a dark green-bronze as the summer progresses.

Sponsor: Sir David Prosser

Memories of friendship and family.

Tree 5: Japanese Pagoda


The foliage of the Japanese Pagoda Tree is bright green, with compound leaves that have very small leaflets giving the tree a light and airy appearance. Once mature, the tree produces yellow-white, pea like flowers.

Sponsor: Robin and Sarah Wilson

This tree is sponsored by Robin and Sarah Wilson for the enjoyment of members.

Tree 6: Silverlime Brabant


Introduced from China in the 1760s, its profuse small yellow flowers develop in late spring. These form lantern shaped fruits that turn red in the autumn.

Sponsor: Sir David Prosser

Memories of friendship and family.

Tree 7: Honey Locust


In its native land of North America, this tree has been known to tower to tremendous heights. This tree is also desirable from an ecological point of view; the pollen harvested by bees from the flowers apparently produces superb honey!

Sponsor: Stuart and Janet Malcolm

In fond remembrance of family and friends.

Tree 8: Arends Field Maple


Dutch in origin with a regular upright habit, making it ideal for gardens and urban areas, Acer campestre Arends thrives on most free draining soils. Its green leaves turn a bright yellow in the autumn.

Sponsor: Sir David Prosser

Memories of friendship and family.

Tree 9: Purple Beech


This pretty, deep foliaged, tree has dark purple red foliage which appears in the spring time and, like many other purple leaved specimens, it gradually turns to a dark green-bronze as the summer progresses.

Sponsor: Pam and Derek Richardson

We have enjoyed more than 50 years of membership of our Club and we hope that you are still enjoying all these wonderful facilities today.

Tree 10: Pride of India


Introduced from China in the 1760s, it thrives best on free draining soils with a sunny aspect. Profuse small yellow flowers develop in late spring and these form lantern shaped fruits that turn red in the autumn.

Sponsor: Brian Turner

Sponsored by the Turner family to celebrate the birthday of our mother Flora Turner who was 104 years old on the 6th November 2019.
With all our love. Brian, Gill, Chris and Sue.

Tree 11: Sweet Gum Worplesdon


From September onwards, this tree reveals lavish autumn colour. It begins with yellow at the very top of the tree, turning to orange, red and then a deep claret colour before it finally falls from the tree.

Sponsor: Michael and Elizabeth Coaten

In loving and living memory of Suzy. Beautiful, enchanting, forever missed. Caroline, Adam, Campbell, Oscar, Connor, Finley, Rory, Sydney, Atalanta. RIP amongst these boughs.

Tree 12: Crimson King Maple


It has discrete yellow flowers that appear in spring and contrast fantastically with the dark purple foliage which gradually turns to maroon over the growing season then on to red in the autumn. The dark colours make a statement in the landscape, as contrasting colours tend to draw attention.

Sponsor: Alfred and Jo Stein

Planting for the future.

Tree 13: Tulip Tree


In its native land of North America, this tree has been known to tower to tremendous heights. This tree is also desirable from an ecological point of view; the pollen harvested by bees from the flowers apparently produces superb honey!

Sponsor: Pam and Derek Richardson

We have enjoyed more than 50 years of membership of our Club and we hope that you are still enjoying all these wonderful facilities today.

Tree 14: Oriental Plane


This cultivar of Oriental Plane has very deeply dissected, large, bright green leaves, which have five lobes. In autumn they turn yellow and brown before falling. As the tree matures the bark forms a patchwork effect by flaking off in sections in the same way that a London Plane does.

Sponsor: Jeffrey Bunting

Mr Arthur Bunting (Pops) 1939-2014,
Fifteen years before the mast,
Walked tall and straight until the last,
This tree standing shall remind us all,
That we remain alive when our leaves fall.

Tree 15: Honey Locust


A pretty and delicate looking tree, which originated in America. The foliage is often late to appear, emerging a brilliant lime yellow colour and hardening to a darker green as the summer progresses.

Sponsor: Stuart and Janet Malcolm

In fond remembrance of family and friends.

Tree 16: Honey Locust


A pretty and delicate looking tree, which originated in America. The foliage is often late to appear, emerging a brilliant lime yellow colour and hardening to a darker green as the summer progresses.

Sponsor: The Club

Tree 17: Maidenhair


Also known as ginkgo biloba, this is a large deciduous tree which develops an irregular, spreading crown with age, fan-shaped, two-lobed leaves and, on female trees, unpleasantly scented yellow fruits each containing a single large seed.

Sponsor: The Club